How to Be an ‘Ingaged’ Leader

By Shimon Brathwaite, Business News Daily Contributing Writer

Traditionally, engaged leadership means involving everyone in the decision-making process. Ingaged leadership takes this one step further: Rather than simply giving everyone a part in the execution phase, ingaged leaders focus on gathering and using employee input in the planning and design of innovative strategies.

It’s important that leaders get employees involved in decision-making by allowing them to contribute ideas when the company is looking to incorporate changes, said Hackel.

After identifying what areas need to be improved, consult with employees who carry out the day-to-day activities. These employees will be the most familiar with the details of these problems and will be able to give insight on what causes problems, such as delays in processes, inefficiencies, etc. Continue reading

8 Common Leadership Mistakes

By Sammi Caramela, B2B Staff Writer

Being a leader comes with a host of responsibilities, including handling workplace issues and setting a good example. You’re often held to high expectations as the person in charge, and managing an entire team of people can be intimidating. However, no one is perfect. Here are eight common mistakes that many leaders are making.

Lacking humility

Holding a position of power may be good for your ego, but it’s important that you and your employees know you’re not above your shortcomings. Leaders must not be afraid to recognize their own failures. Struggling with our mistakes helps us grow and makes us stronger. When employees recognize that failure is natural, even for leaders, they’ll feel more open-minded and confident.

Thinking emotionally

It’s easy to let your feelings cloud your judgement. But in business, using emotions as the justification for a decision can be detrimental. When you’re making decisions based on emotion the team may understand the logic backing your choices.  Therefore, they cannot trust your decisions. It leads to confusion, uncertainty of future roadmap plans or the validity of the decisions over time, slowly chiseling away at the effectiveness of the leader. Continue reading

A Good Leader: Characteristics and Some Tips

By Sammi Caramela, B2B Staff Writer

It takes time to adjust to a new position at work, especially when you’re taking on a management role. Your responsibility is to guide an entire team to success; instead of turning to someone for supervision, you’re the person others turn to.

It might feel like you’re grasping at straws, but you’re not alone – many new managers feel overwhelmed. We outlined characteristics of a good manager.

Every manager should work on developing these four characteristics.

Collaborative

You want to be passionate about working with your team and encourage your employees to feel the same. While independent work is important, teamwork can establish a more welcoming, supportive company culture.

Growth-oriented

As a manager, you should focus on helping your employees progress – individually and collectively. Get to know your workers on a personal level so you can help them leverage their interests and talents. Find what works and what doesn’t.

Inclusive

If you want your team to take risks and contribute to projects, you need to make sure they feel comfortable doing so. Leading by example is a great way to achieve this. Just because you’re a manager doesn’t mean you can’t ask for help. Turn to your team when you’re at a loss. Start a conversation, and discuss their comments.

Impact-driven

Every worker wants to feel valued. If they don’t believe their work is meaningful, making a difference in some way, they won’t be as motivated.

A good leader will form a connection between individual goals and company goals, reminding each worker why their job is so important. Show your appreciation for each member’s effort. Continue reading

3 Important Things to Teach Your Future Leaders

By Nicole Fallon, Business News Daily Managing Editor

Some people seem to be born to be leaders. However, even if you have some features necessary to be a leader, people don’t simply become great leaders overnight. They must be developed through ongoing learning and training opportunities. If you want to invest in your company’s future through leadership training, here are a few key things to keep in mind.

Help them understand the difference between leading and managing.

If a leadership candidate seems more excited about being “the boss” who’s in charge of others, they’re probably not the best person for the job. Leadership is different from management. Leaders need to be interested in growing the skills of others, not just in delegating tasks or managing processes. Effective leadership coaching should include a focus on self-awareness and emotional intelligence, empathy, managing change, and the importance of mentoring others to be strong leaders. Continue reading

4 Ways of Leadership Definition

By Sammi Caramela, B2B Staff Writer

Leadership is critical to every company. Workers need someone to look to, learn from and thrive with. Every leader has their own style and strategy. Further, leadership styles and methods vary because of outside influences and personal challenges.

While leadership is unique to everyone, there are some common ways to define the term. Peter Economy, also known as “The Leadership Guy,” listed the qualities of today’s best leadership

  • Decisiveness
  • Awareness
  • Focus
  • Accountability
  • Empathy
  • Confidence
  • Optimism
  • Honesty
  • Inspiration

According to research published in Harvard Business Review there are some common leadership styles: Continue reading

You Can’t Succeed Alone Because That is Not Success

You Can’t Succeed Alone Because That is Not Success
Let us suppose for just a moment that you could get to the mountain top of success all byyourself. You have worked very hard and finally you have made it. You have reached thepeak. Your success is secure. You have won the trophy. Something is not right though. It istoo quiet. Where is all the clapping? Where are all the cheers? You look around and discoverthat you are all alone. Where is everybody? Then you remember you succeeded by yourself. All of a sudden your joy turns to sorrow. Your head falls, your shoulders slump. It wasn’tsupposed to be like this. This was supposed to be the best day of your life. As a tear rollsdown your face, you throw the trophy off the mountaintop. You watch it descend to thevalley. When it impacts it breaks into a thousand pieces just like your spirit.My friend, what fun would success be without people to share it with? We need people andthey need us. The great wonderful fact is that we can’t reach the mountaintop of success allby ourselves. Only with people will we be truly successful. We help hem succeed and theyhelp us. It is a team effort. It was Jim Rohn who said, “You cannot succeed by yourself. It’shard to find a rich hermit.”We don’t want to be rich hermits. We want to be build rich teams. Rich in relationships, richin money, rich in skills, and rich in faith. When you have accomplished that, that is whenyou know you are a success.
Dr. Shailesh Thaker
renowned management guru, human potentiality, philosopher, authorand motivator in India, offers HR/HRD Training, Leadership Workshops, ManagementTraining, CEO Training and business consulting services through
Knowledge Inc.
Let us suppose for just a moment that you could get to the mountain top of success all by yourself. You have worked very hard and finally you have made it. You have reached the peak. Your success is secure. You have won the trophy. Something is not right though. It is too quiet. Where is all the clapping? Where are all the cheers? You look around and discover that you are all alone. Where is everybody? Then you remember you succeeded by yourself. All of a sudden your joy turns to sorrow. Your head falls, your shoulders slump. It wasn’t supposed to be like this. This was supposed to be the best day of your life. Continue reading

Types of leadership styles

The bureaucratic leader (Weber, 1905) is very structured and follows the proceduresas they have been established. This type of leadership has no space to explore new waysto solve problems and is usually slow paced to ensure adherence to the ladders statedby the company. Leaders ensure that all the steps have been followed prior to sending itto the next level of authority. Universities, hospitals, banks and government usuallyrequire this type of leader in their organizations to ensure quality, increase security anddecrease corruption. Leaders that try to speed up the process will experience frustrationand anxiety. Continue reading

Leadership Styles in Financial Companies versus Non Financial Companies

The recent financial turmoil has gone by several different names; the ‘Recession’, the ‘Credit-Crunch’ or the ‘Financial Meltdown’. What is consistent however is the scathing view of the broadcasters and politicians of the business leaders who ran the financial institutions that either collapsed or required government cash injections to remain operational. For example, the financial products division of AIG (American International Group) was led by Joseph Cassano, who made big bets with AIG’s reserves on the worthiness of mortgaged backed securities – which increased short term profits but ultimately led to the destruction of the corporation.
At the heart of the criticism is their lack of governance over risk. This is the polite way of wording the accusation that many leaders were reckless with shareholder funds, and leveraged the financial institutions – gearing up the risk, in order to inflate their own bonuses.
These are damning criticisms indeed. But I wonder out-loud whether these negative characteristics apply only to financial institutions, and not their industrial counterparts. Are industrial leaders really more risk averse and reliable? Or, as I propose – has the media simply ‘assumed’ that industrial leadership is steadier than the financial sector, because of the simple fact that no bad stories were emerging from the sector?
Well, we could look at corporate failures in the past few decades to allow us to conclude on how the two industries stack up. If we take a look at Wikipedia’s ‘List of Business Failures’ page, we can see that there were many financial companies that met the criteria for listing. The list hides many failed companies which were acquired by larger groups and merged into their operations.
What is evident is that countless industrials and other non-financials failed in the last decade, including Borders Group (Book Store), BlockBusters (Video Store) and News of The World (British Newspaper). The volume of non-financial organisations is surprising – with no financial companies featuring in the 2010, 2011 or 2012-to-date listing. The reasons for these failures vary. Some companies operate in dying industries (such as those where products are moving to online product leaders and away from traditional retailers and distributors), however one can be confident that shareholders ridiculed Blockbuster’s leadership team for not foreseeing and responding to this seismic shift in the marketplace, which has occurred gradually from 2004 onwards since the founding of YouTube. We could therefore easily suggest that bad leadership is not the premise of financial institutions alone.
AIGThe recent financial turmoil has gone by several different names; the ‘Recession’, the ‘Credit-Crunch’ or the ‘Financial Meltdown’. What is consistent however is the scathing view of the broadcasters and politicians of the business leaders who ran the financial institutions that either collapsed or required government cash injections to remain operational. For example, the financial products division of AIG (American International Group) was led by Joseph Cassano, who made big bets with AIG’s reserves on the worthiness of mortgaged backed securities – which increased short term profits but ultimately led to the destruction of the corporation.
At the heart of the criticism is their lack of governance over risk. This is the polite way of wording the accusation that many leaders were reckless with shareholder funds, and leveraged the financial institutions – gearing up the risk, in order to inflate their own bonuses.

Leaders Are Organized

Leaders Have High Energy Levels
Leaders must have plenty of energy, for themselves and for the group they lead. Leaders do whatever it takes, to get things done. People will naturally follow the high energy example set by leaders, and thus the group achieves its goals through enthusiastic work and determination.
Leaders Are Organized
Leaders are able to take a chaotic situation, and organize it. It helps immensely to be goal-directed and focused, as we’ve already discussed. Beyond that, it is important that the leader have the ability to manage complexity and juggle many different priorities. That’s why the art of juggling (throwing three balls or other objects in the air) is sometimes taught at leadership seminars. To successfully juggle three objects, one must learn to pay close attention to one object at a time, without completely ignoring the others. Successful leadership is similar. Leaders must be able to focus on specific issues, while considering them in the context of all the group’s other issues.
Leaders must also be able to identify the skills, passions and interests of each group member, so as to effectively utilize those resources. People will contribute more to the group effort when their responsibilities are appropriate to their abilities, and leaders make sure this is the case.
Often in a group, there is a duplication of effort, which can be wasteful. Good, effective leadership can keep this to a minimum. While it is not the leader’s job to micro-manage every detail, effective leaders need to have a working knowledge of what is going on throughout the group. The leader serves as a communication link between group members, with the goal of making their work more efficient and effective. Leaders don’t do all the work themselves, but they do stay up to date everything that’s going on. By so doing, leaders can spot ways to best utilize all the various resources present in the group, and bring about the achievement of the group’s objectives.
The successful leader must manage and organize competently. To do so, requires clearly stated goals, a well-developed plan of action, knowledge of the resources available to the group, the commitment of each group member, and the discipline to work with diligence. Leadership is hard work, it doesn’t just happen. And much of the work comes in organizing the efforts of the group. Leadership brings with it, many details which absolutely must be attended to. Leaders must be highly organized, or they will be overwhelmed.

Leaders Have High Energy Levels

Leadership-SkillsLeaders must have plenty of energy, for themselves and for the group they lead. Leaders do whatever it takes, to get things done. People will naturally follow the high energy example set by leaders, and thus the group achieves its goals through enthusiastic work and determination.

Leaders Are Organized

Leaders are able to take a chaotic situation, and organize it. It helps immensely to be goal-directed and focused, as we’ve already discussed. Beyond that, it is important that the leader have the ability to manage complexity and juggle many different priorities. That’s why the art of juggling (throwing three balls or other objects in the air) is sometimes taught at leadership seminars. To successfully juggle three objects, one must learn to pay close attention to one object at a time, without completely ignoring the others. Successful leadership is similar. Leaders must be able to focus on specific issues, while considering them in the context of all the group’s other issues. Continue reading

4 Simple Ideas for Learning Better

As leaders we live in a learning rich environment…
…but that doesn’t necessarily mean we are learning.
It is easy to think that we’re learning as we go, but in reality we are often just gathering experiences and extracting little in the way of lessons. Learning requires intentionality, and if you don’t make it an overt objective in your journey, it probably won’t happen consistently.
To be a better, faster learner you need to do these things:
1. Slow down. If you are moving too fast, information is getting passed over or filtered out.
2. Reflect. That means contemplating not just on what happened, but what it means.
3. Record. Keeping a journal will help you capture lessons to review or reconsider in the future.
4. Share. You’ll gain additional insights and notice nuances when you share what you’ve learned with others, whether your team or someone you mentor.
So what have you learned this week?
Share it with someone who needs to know.
As leaders we live in a learning rich environment…
…but that doesn’t necessarily mean we are learning.
It is easy to think that we’re learning as we go, but in reality we are often just gathering experiences and extracting little in the way of lessons. Learning requires intentionality, and if you don’t make it an overt objective in your journey, it probably won’t happen consistently.
To be a better, faster learner you need to do these things: Continue reading